DCIM\100GOPRO
Subscribe
RSS
Archive
January (3) February March April May June July August September (4) October (3) November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June (1) July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December

Zeniarai Benten Shrine

October 14, 2015  •  Leave a Comment

Zeniarai Benzaiten Ugafuku Shrine

Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan

iPhone 6

 

Hidden above Kamakura, along the Daibutsu Hiking Course is an amazing little shrine, Zeniarai Benten. Not very well known by foreign tourists, this shrine is popularized by locals as a shrine for wealth. The primary draw of the shrine is a cave, where spring water freely flows into a basin tucked inside. Visitors may (for a price) wash their money in the basin. Where it is believed, upon spending that money, it will return to your several fold. The higher the denomination of the currency you wash, the more money returns.
Like a faith based investment.

From the road, only a tunnel and a Tori gate denote Zeniarai Benten shrine. Pass through the tunnel into the open grotto, housing not just one, but several shrines. Shrines to various gods and spirits of luck. Koi ponds, bridges, incense, and the cave really make Zeniarai Benten a special place.

:Nearby:

1: Kotoku-in; The Kamakura Daibutsu (The Great Buddha of Kamakura). On the Western end of Kamakura is a colossal statue of a Buddha, one of the largest and oldest in Japan. It is best reached by cab, though the hiking trails and paths are a great alternative.
2: Tsurugaoka Hachiman-gū; A massive temple complex at the head of the main avenue in Kamakura. The Temple was built when Kamakura was the capital of feudal Japan. The temple is famous for it's former 1000 year old 'Hiding Ginkgo Tree', where rumor has it, a Ninja assassinated a Minamoto Lord by jumping from it's limbs. The Tree was unfortunately blown over in a typhoon.
3: Kenchō-ji; One of the single oldest temples in all of Japan, still standing of course. ​The gate of Kenchō-ji was built in the 600s, an amazing feat of wooden engineering. The staff is very friendly, but don't speak any English. Kenchō-ji is the Entrance to the Ten-en hiking course, and also leads way to the Hansobo shrine. Hansobo shrine is dedicated to the Tengu (bird-faced imps) who inhabited the mountains. There are dozens of statues of these creatures littering the shrine's surroundings, and marks the true start of the Ten-en hiking trail.

:How to get there:

Follow the Daibutsu Hiking Course out of Kamakura's main thoroughfare.
On the west side of Genjiyama Park, follow the road down slope away from the hiking course. On the right will be the tunnel entrance.
Alternatively, you can take a cab.

From Tokyo, take the Yokosuka Line train from Tokyo Station. The ride is about 1 hour and 10 minutes and costs about $18 round trip.​​​

:When to go:

Any time of year is a great time to visit Kamakura. I visited in mid December, and the temperature was very pleasant.
Mid Summer might be a bit warmer than expected.

 


Comments

No comments posted.
Loading...